Pauză, poză, poezie, poeseu

 

Ieri am publicat ilustrațiile pentru poeziile lunii, azi trimit newsletterul pe care-l termin imediat, dar imediat după ce mai citesc o dată cel mai frumos poeseu peste care-am dat în ultima vreme.
M-am uitat la autor și am găsit-o pe Patricia Lockwood și doar ce-mi pusesem la cap Priestdaddy-ul ei, ce serendipity (încă citesc memoirs only, nu prea pot ficțiune de ceva timp).

Mic pasaj din comoară:


How Do We Write Now?

“The alternate title of this, of course, is how the fuck do we write now.

Just as the customary greeting of hello has been replaced with what the fuck is going on, and you grab your friend’s arm almost against your will and shake her a little bit and say no seriously, what the fuck is happening.

Just as your face has been replaced by a question mark immediately followed by an exclamation mark immediately followed by another question mark.

Just as your heart has been replaced by what happens to a bunch of seagulls when a dog comes running down the beach.

Just as your blood now carries in its current the Jaws theme.

Just as some days I put my bra on inside-out and it seems too hard to fix so I just sit there staring at the news in an inside-out bra.

Just as whenever you read one of those super-positive Lin-Manuel Miranda tweets that’s like

G’MORNING.
YOU’RE A GORGEOUS RAY OF BABY LIGHT THAT SHINES ON ALL HUMANITY

you picture the president reading it and nodding and thinking, he’s talking about me.

That your attention is in one sense the most precious part of you, it is your soul spending yourself, to teach you that there’s always more.”

 

Cadou ceramic de la Alexandra Mîrzac <3

 

 

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5poems (Vol. 2)

 

5 poems I love recently landed in the magic-making hands of 5 local illustrators.
Wanda, Dragoș, Anna, Andreea and Daia hosted the poems in their hearts for a week and now we’re sending them into the world as delightful illustrations.

Enjoy reading the chosen poems and zooming in on their amazing visual alter egos:

 



ONE ART
by Elizabeth Bishop

The art of losing isn’t hard to master;
so many things seem filled with the intent
to be lost that their loss is no disaster.

Lose something every day. Accept the fluster
of lost door keys, the hour badly spent.
The art of losing isn’t hard to master.

Then practice losing farther, losing faster:
places, and names, and where it was you meant
to travel. None of these will bring disaster.

I lost my mother’s watch. And look! my last, or
next-to-last, of three loved houses went.
The art of losing isn’t hard to master.

I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster,
some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent.
I miss them, but it wasn’t a disaster.

—Even losing you (the joking voice, a gesture
I love) I shan’t have lied. It’s evident
the art of losing’s not too hard to master

though it may look like (Write it!) like disaster.

(Published in The Complete Poems 1926-1979. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1983.
Copyright © 1979, 1983 by Alice Helen Methfessel.)

Illustration by Wanda Hutira
instagram.com/que_nais
www.behance.net/ceNais
www.facebook.com/wanda.hutira
facebook.com/Ostra-Berdo

 



AS PLANNED
by Frank O’Hara

After the first glass of vodka
you can accept just about anything
of life even your own mysteriousness
you think it is nice that a box
of matches is purple and brown and is called
La Petite and comes from Sweden
for they are words that you know and that
is all you know words not their feelings
or what they mean and you write because
you know them not because you understand them
because you don’t you are stupid and lazy
and will never be great but you do
what you know because what else is there?

(Published in The Paris Review, Issue 49, Summer 1970)

Illustration by Dragoș Boțcău
instagram.com/dragovod
behance.net/dragosbotcau

 



THE PARADOX

by Sarah Kay

When I am inside writing,
all I can think about is how I should be outside living.

When I am outside living,
all I can do is notice all there is to write about.

When I read about love, I think I should be out loving.
When I love, I think I need to read more.

I am stumbling in pursuit of grace,
I hunt patience with a vengeance.

On the mornings when my brother’s tired muscles
held to the pillow, my father used to tell him,

For every moment you aren’t playing basketball,
someone else is on the court practicing.

I spend most of my time wondering
if I should be somewhere else.

So I have learned to shape the words thank you
with my first breath each morning, my last breath every night.

When the last breath comes, at least I will know I was thankful
for all the places I was so sure I was not supposed to be.

All those places I made it to,
all the loves I held, all the words I wrote.

And even if it is just for one moment,
I will be exactly where I am supposed to be.

(From No Matter the Wreckage, published in 2014 by Write Bloody Publishing)

Illustration by Anna Florea
1/2 of rivulet.studio
instagram.com/annaflorea
annaflorea.tumblr.com

 



POSSIBILITIES

by Wisława Szymborska

I prefer movies.
I prefer cats.
I prefer the oaks along the Warta.
I prefer Dickens to Dostoyevsky.
I prefer myself liking people
to myself loving mankind.
I prefer keeping a needle and thread on hand, just in case.
I prefer the color green.
I prefer not to maintain
that reason is to blame for everything.
I prefer exceptions.
I prefer to leave early.
I prefer talking to doctors about something else.
I prefer the old fine-lined illustrations.
I prefer the absurdity of writing poems
to the absurdity of not writing poems.
I prefer, where love’s concerned, nonspecific anniversaries
that can be celebrated every day.
I prefer moralists
who promise me nothing.
I prefer cunning kindness to the over-trustful kind.
I prefer the earth in civvies.
I prefer conquered to conquering countries.
I prefer having some reservations.
I prefer the hell of chaos to the hell of order.
I prefer Grimms’ fairy tales to the newspapers’ front pages.
I prefer leaves without flowers to flowers without leaves.
I prefer dogs with uncropped tails.
I prefer light eyes, since mine are dark.
I prefer desk drawers.
I prefer many things that I haven’t mentioned here
to many things I’ve also left unsaid.
I prefer zeroes on the loose
to those lined up behind a cipher.
I prefer the time of insects to the time of stars.
I prefer to knock on wood.
I prefer not to ask how much longer and when.
I prefer keeping in mind even the possibility
that existence has its own reason for being.

(From Nothing Twice, 1997. Translated by Stanislaw Baranczak and Clare Cavanagh.
Copyright © Wislawa Szymborska, S. Baranczak & C. Cavanagh)


Illustration by Andreea Moise
instagram.com/theycallmelebski
behance.net/lebski

 



KEEPING QUIET
by Pablo Neruda

Now we will count to twelve
and we will all keep still.

For once on the face of the earth,
let’s not speak in any language;
let’s stop for one second,
and not move our arms so much.

It would be an exotic moment
without rush, without engines;
we would all be together
in a sudden strangeness.

Fisherman in the cold sea
would not harm whales
and the man gathering salt
would look at his hurt hands.

Those who prepare green wars,
wars with gas, wars with fire,
victories with no survivors,
would put on clean clothes
and walk about with their brothers
in the shade, doing nothing.

What I want should not be confused
with total inactivity.
Life is what it is about;
I want no truck with death.

If we were not so single-minded
about keeping our lives moving,
and for once could do nothing,
perhaps a huge silence
might interrupt this sadness
of never understanding ourselves
and of threatening ourselves with death.
Perhaps the earth can teach us
as when everything seems dead
and later proves to be alive.

Now I’ll count up to twelve
and you keep quiet and I will go.

(From Extravagaria, 1974. Translated by Alastair Reid)

Illustration by Daia Grigore
instagram.com/daia_dianagrigore
www.behance.net/drag198b8f

 


I am most grateful to these wonderful creatures for jumping in so fast (they only had 1 week to squeeze the task in their schedules and send me the illustrations) and I’d be really happy around my belly button if you showed off your love by following their work and sharing this piece with a friend.

 

About 5poems:

I decided to choose 5 poems every month (there is a list, and it’s growing bigger and bigger) and share them with the world. A world that might just come to love them as much as I do. And with a little help from my friends, there will also be yummy custom-made illustrations.
Around each month’s end, the poems and their fresh illustrations will be revealed on a dedicated Instagram account – @5poems (yes, please, do follow us). All goodies will also be printed and exhibited in our pocket bookshop+gallery (Receptor / Cărturești & Friends). And when it’s time for another round, the previous small prints will settle into the family album – a permanent collection gathering all illustrations and poems featured monthly.
Check out Volume 1 here.

 

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5poems

 

It’s World Poetry Day today and less than a week ago I decided to make yet another stressful appearance in the inboxes of my fellow illustrators. In a sugar rush, I asked 5 friends if they were interested in making some super quick drawings inspired by… poems. Short poems. Short poems I’ve chosen for them. They said yes.

Here’s what’s gotten into me: until two or three years ago I had rejected poetry just like I’d shoo Jehovah’s Witnesses away. Or maybe worse. And all thanks to those dark memories from my school years, memories made of mandatory memorization terror (both of the poems, and the critics’ view on them), of lame lyrics I could never relate to and oh, man, the excruciating overdose of indecipherable archaisms.

Recently though, I gave poetry a second chance (thanks, Tara, for showing me the way to truly love it).

***

Back to the game: I decided to choose 5 poems every month (there is a list, and it’s growing bigger and bigger) and share them with the world. A world that might just come to love them as much as I do. And with a little help from my friends, there will also be yummy custom-made illustrations.
Around each month’s end, the poems and their fresh illustrations will be revealed on a dedicated Instagram account – @5poems (yes, please, do follow us). All goodies will also be printed and exhibited in our pocket bookshop+gallery (Receptor / Cărturești & Friends). When it’s time for another round, the previous small prints will settle into the family album – a permanent collection gathering all illustrations and poems featured monthly.

Here are this month’s chosen ones:



AESTHETICS OF BEING A BIRD
by Kenneth Koch

Eat brusquely
With a half-closed mouth;
When another speaks, glance up
But don’t respond.
After you have eaten
Take off
And sing
Portuguese songs — a fado, if you please!

(Published in The Paris Review, Issue 120, Fall 1991)

Illustration by Iulia Ignat
iuliaignatillustrator.com
facebook.com/iuliaignatillustrator

 



CLOUD STUDY
by Andrea Cohen

How do clouds
learn to be clouds?

They study what
Constable—seeing them—

saw: awe for sure,
but also a falling

away from any sense
of earthly surface. Zero

horizon. “Skying,” he called
his hundred sketches. Think

of the Great Wallendas stretching
netless above gorges: a cloud

learns not to look down.

(Published in The New Yorker, April 2016)

Illustration by Irina Georgescu
behance.net/irinageorgescu 
facebook.com/irinageorgescuillustration

 



SLEEPING

by Raymond Carver

He slept on his hands.
On a rock.
On his feet.
On someone else’s feet.
He slept on buses, trains, in airplanes.
Slept on duty.
Slept beside the road.
Slept on a sack of apples.
He slept in a pay toilet.
In a hayloft.
In the Super Dome.
Slept in a Jaguar, and in the back of a pickup.
Slept in theaters.
In jail.
On boats.
He slept in line shacks and, once, in a castle.
Slept in the rain.
In blistering sun.
On horseback he slept.
He slept in chairs, churches, in fancy hotels.
He slept under strange roofs all his life.
Now he sleeps under the earth.
Sleeps on and on.
Like an old king.

(Published in Ultramarine, in 1986)

Illustration by Irina Perju
behance.net/irinaperju
facebook.com/irina.perju.illustration 
instagram.com/irina.perju



JANUARY

by Charles Simic

Children’s fingerprints
On a frozen window
Of a small schoolhouse.

An empire, I read somewhere,
Maintains itself through
The cruelty of its prisons.

(Published in The Paris Review, Spring 2015)


Illustration by Amina Burloiu
instagram.com/amina.burloiu
facebook.com/minabua



THE TIGER
by Nael, age 6

The tiger
He destroyed his cage
Yes
YES
The tiger is out

(Published in “You Will Be Able to Say a Thousand Words”)

Illustration by Mura
instagram.com/madebymura
facebook.com/madebymura

 


I am most grateful to the girls for jumping in so fast (they only had 2-3 days to squeeze the task in their schedules and send me the illustrations) and I’d be really happy around my belly button if you showed off your love by following their work and sharing this piece with a friend, who knows, maybe you’ll get one of the art prints exhibited at the bookshop (they’ll be up there ready to be catcalled starting tomorrow).

 

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